Bald Eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus

The Bald Eagle requires old-growth and mature stands of coniferous or hardwood trees near large bodies of open water with an abundance of fish.
The Bald Eagle is extremely sensitive to human activity, and is found most commonly in areas free of human disturbance.
A Bald Eagle is a very powerful flier, making use of thermal convection currents to gain altitude. It reaches speeds of 5670 kilometres per hour when gliding and flapping and can dive at speeds of up to 160 kilometers per hour.

Bald Eagles mature at four or five years of age and when they are old enough to breed, they often return to the area where they were born. It is thought that Bald Eagles mate for life. However, if one member of a pair dies or disappears, the other will choose a new mate. Bald Eagle courtship involves elaborate calls and flight displays, including swoops, chases, and cartwheels in which they fly high and, after locking talons, will free fall separating just before hitting the ground. Their nests, which are used repeatedly over many years, are among the largest of any bird in in the world and can become as large as 13 ft deep and 8.2 ft across weighing around 1 metric ton.
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Genus:
Species:
Animalia
Chordata
Aves
Accipitriformes
Accipitridae
Haliaeetus
Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Resources
Bald Eagles on Wikipdia


Page 1 of 1